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Archive for October, 2009

I posted a new video today. I still have some work to do on the video quality when it gets to YT, but I’m glad to have it posted… More to come.

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This morning I posted my first YouTube video. It’s a gear review of DartMaster’s Solo series dart case. Short video that was created primarily as a proof of concept (POC) for some other video ideas I have.

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seasoned wood on seasoned lograck

seasoned wood on seasoned log rack

Example of the racks I made-
spisblog_lograck_plans.pdf

To help familiarize myself with the recently installed Inkscape Vector Graphics Program (on my Linux box), I created a simple plan for the log racks I built last fall. This was my first use of this application, so the drawing is not to scale and can use a fair amount of refinement.

From my experience this simply designed, inexpensive to build, log rack can support a lot of weight. As I mentioned in my previous posts I loaded them up with freshly split oak and maple in the fall. I set them on some inexpensive concrete patio pavers so they wouldn’t sink into the muddy ground during the spring thaw and rainy spring. They made it through the hard Midwest winter and very wet spring with ease. A couple of the racks were on a slight slope and were not level when I loaded them. They ended up twisting out of square, but they held together just fine. The ones that were level look as good and true as the day I built them.

The first (proof of concept) rack I made didn’t have the middle support. One of the long 2×4’s broke under the load. There was a knot in the middle of the 2×4 that caused it to fail. I suspected it was going to have problems because the long run was sagging a bit within a month of loading it. I just never got back to install the middle support. I used more care when selecting the boards for the long runs of the other three racks. They all held up fine.

I found that I like these racks better than the metal tube racks. They are wider, more stable, hold more wood, look better and are easier to cover. They fit my needs for a cheap, simple, efficient way to store a surplus of firewood. It got the wood off the ground and helped it season without getting moldy, rotten of full or rodents.

Here’s an interesting book I’m planning to check out all about¬†¬†woodburning- “The Woodburner’s Companion” by Dirk Thomas

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One of the tasks that’s been on my home project list for while is the installation of some heat control window film. All of the windows in the house have Pella’s build-in solar blinds except the transom windows in our great room, the half-round in the loft and the basement daylight windows. On sunny days these few windows can really heat up the house.

We’ve considered blinds for the transom windows but felt that it would restrict too much light and wouldn’t look very good.

The solar film should fit our needs for privacy, sun-screen, solar reflection, reduced fading and winter heat loss.

The film we’ve chosen is Gila’s Platinum all-season heat control window film. The box states that it rejects 70% of the sun’s heat, low-e retains winter heat, blocks glare, and reduces fading. As a bonus, there’s a 2009 federal tax credit for window film.

Today I installed the film on all six of the basement windows. The install went quickly and the end result looks great! The rest of the windows will get their treatment tomorrow.

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